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Richard Rampersad

In his first solo show since graduating from UWI in 2013 with a bachelor’s degree in visual arts, Richard Rampersad explores women’s identities and experiences. “In this body of work, my primary concern is violence against women,” said Rampersad. His investigation takes the form of acrylic paint on canvas, mixed media works and several ceramic pieces, which feature the female figure as the focal point.

In the painting Strategic Disengagement, Rampersad questions whether letting go is the same as giving up. In the collage piece Dance-in to Dance-out, the female in the image constrains her vision so that she zones out of a painful circumstance. Dance or the movement of her body becomes a means of emotional and physical escape. While Rampersad shares his renderings of women and his considerations of their social and psychological worlds, he remains aware that viewers can bring their own interpretations to his art. It is a viewing experience he welcomes. A key idea in this exhibition, therefore, is ambivalence.

“I don’t want people to view this body of work and immediately say: ‘Oh this is what he meant.’ No, I want people to get a double meaning, and to question it, like ‘Maybe it means this’ or ‘Maybe it could mean that.’ Through my work, I seek to invite the viewer to move into a space of questioning,” Rampersad explained. By encouraging audiences to interrogate the many possible layers of meaning in his work, he exposes the multidimensionality and complexities of being a woman in today’s societies. Richard Rampersad’s Subjectivity, Ambivalence and the Contemporary Imagination opens on July 19, from 6 pm at the Art Society, corner of Jamaica Boulevard and St Vincent Avenue, Federation Park. The exhibition runs through July 24. Gallery hours: 10 am–5 pm daily.

Richard Rampersad is a nationally recognised artist who specialises in figurative painting and Ceramics. His patrons include many distinguished members of the private sector as well as corporate, academic, religious and cultural personalities.

Rampersad was born in the year 1990 and grew up in the suburbs of Valsayn. He began his art education at the University of the West Indies, pursuing a Certificate in Visual Arts and then moved on to obtain his degree in Fine Arts with First Class Honours. His extraordinary achievements throughout his artistic career have made him one of the most influential figurative painters in the Contemporary Caribbean Art realm.
His artistic expression goes beyond pictorial representation and becomes the affirmation of one whose ontological foundation expresses the will to use the media as a vehicle to convey an idea or narrative. “I seek to make an advancement in the visual understanding of my figures and in how this subject matter can be rendered”. There is indeed a strong awareness for the contrast of tone and a conspicuous depiction of light, whether subdued or intense.

His graphic statements are capable of speaking very clearly to us about our current concerns and is a “joy” to the observer. The arrangement of his subject is somewhat schematic, inviting the viewer to move into a space of speculation. Questioning the real and the surreal. “My non-orthodox style of rendering my subject matter supersedes naturalistic accuracy”. He is indeed a promising, pervasive and all- encompassing artist, whose works merit close watching.


Read the original article on the Trinidad & Tobago Guardian, and RSVP to the event on Facebook here.

- See more at: http://arcthemagazine.com/arc/2014/07/the-trinidad-tobago-guardian-shares-art-of-ambivalence-solo-show-by-richard-rampersad/#sthash.uJwiISRY.dpuf


Spirit Level at CCA Glasgow

The three artists in Spirit Levels share a fascination with line and form, though each of them balance their interest in abstraction through differing acknowledgements of cultural and social realities.

Tony Cruz works mainly with drawing, including large-scale geometrical pieces, wall drawings and collected sequences of images. The more abstract images are offset with smaller figurative motifs referencing Puerto Rican life, such as baseball and Salsa music. Adele Todd’s work employs domestic materials and techniques such as thread, embroidery, felt and trapunto. These ‘soft materials,’ as she puts it herself, are used to outline abstract forms across a space, but often they are grounded in specific social concerns, such as the stereotyping of both boys and girls coming-of-age in Trinidadian culture.

Remy Jungerman shares this approach to the abstract, though he focuses more on the exchange of knowledge between cultures and on concepts of trans-nationality, reflecting his own global shift from Suriname to the Netherlands, where he has been living and working since the late 1980s.

Spirituality is another element that flows through these artists’ works. Both Cruz and Jungerman, for instance, explore aspects of Santeria and Winti, religions that syncretise African gods and Christian saints and which play a key role in Caribbean and Latin American culture.

In this exhibition, the artists challenge the capacity of contemporary art to absorb elements of spiritual life at a time when parts of the art world itself are dominated by secular materialism. Equally, the exhibition raises questions around the importance of race, colonialism and the transmission of ideas from local positions to international arenas.

With thanks to the Royal Overseas League and the on-going ROSL international artist’s residency programme at Hospitalfield Arts.


dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.

dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.

This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.

Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.

Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.

In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.

And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.

Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.

13 June – 25 August 2014
Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30)
Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)

Terrace Rooms, South Wing
Free admission

More events.


Kickstarter Campaign: Charlie Phillips presents How Great Thou Art →

latinocaribbeanartists:

What is How Great Thou Art?

How Great Thou Art is a sensitive photographic documentary of the social and emotional traditions that surround death in London’s African Caribbean community.

The title for this book and exhibition is borrowed from the popular hymn sung at funerals. The song How Great Thou Art praises the life of an individual, and this project is a declaration of love and celebration for the traditions and cultures of the African diaspora in London.

In his time attending and photographing funerals in his community Charlie has witnessed huge changes and emerging traditions in burial and mourning practices. From the disappearance of bodies lying on dining room tables, to the establishment of black funeral directors and the booming business of burying and celebrating the dead.

How Great Thou Art represents a lifetimes work by Charlie, and the book presents you with a rare opportunity to engage with, learn from, and celebrate these rapidly changing mourning traditions and practices London’s African Caribbean community.

Why we need your help

This is not a commercially viable project; funerals are only big business for undertakers. We hope that by reading this information, watching our videos, and thinking about your own experiences of funerals, you might see the value in exploring and contextualizing the values and traditions that British cultures place upon death, burial and a celebration of life.

Your support for this project through pre-orders or larger pledges will cover the costs of producing a first edition of the book. The book will stand as a permanent legacy for not just Charlie’s work, but importantly for the community he has lovingly documented.

The book can survive in libraries, bookshelves and classrooms for years into the future, revealing the currently untold story of how the African Caribbean community established new traditions for life and death in the London.

This campaign only has 16 days left to reach its goal. Let’s make it happen!


Firelie Baez

Firelei Baez makes large scale, intricate works on paper that are intrinsically indebted to a rigorous studio practice. Through a convergence of interest in anthropology, science fiction, black female subjectivity and women’s work; her art explores the humor and fantasy involved in self-making within diasporic societies, which have an ability to live with cultural ambiguities and use them to build psychological and even metaphysical defenses against cultural invasions.

She received a B.F.A. from The Cooper Union’s School of Art in 2004, participated in The Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2008, and later received an M.F.A. from Hunter College in 2010. She has held residencies at The Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Workspace, The Lower East Side Print Shop and The Bronx Museum’s Artist in the Marketplace.

Baez’s work has been written about in The New York Times, The LA Times, Artforum, Art in America, New American Paintings, The Huffington Post and Studio Museum Magazine. Her work will be featured in the upcoming Phaidon drawing anthology Vitamin D2.

She was a recipient of the prestigious Joan Mitchell Painters and Sculptors Award as well as the Jaque and Natasha Gelman Award in Painting.

Her work is currently on view at The Studio Museum’s emerging artist exhibition Fore.

(Source: http)


laurenhinds:

Truths
Starting this week I’l be posting Undiscovered as a weekly on Wednesdays. This is to free my time a bit to focus on my other projects. Thank you for embracing Danielle with all her daily disappointments, joys, fears, doubts and conclusions as she tries to discover herself. View Larger

laurenhinds:

Truths

Starting this week I’l be posting Undiscovered as a weekly on Wednesdays. This is to free my time a bit to focus on my other projects. Thank you for embracing Danielle with all her daily disappointments, joys, fears, doubts and conclusions as she tries to discover herself.